Socially Responsible Investing (“SRI”)

Socially Responsible Investing (“SRI”)

Socially Responsible Investing or “SRI” is an investment style that is often referred to as “do no harm.”  It is an investment strategy that uses various screens or filters (such as ESG factors) to eliminate securities from an investment portfolio that are considered to be harmful to the environment (e.g. coal power) or to society (alcohol, tobacco, pornography, gambling).  This latter category is also sometimes referred to as “sin stocks” as they deal with sectors that are considered by some to be unethical or immoral. See also “Sustainable Investing.”

United Nations Development Program (UNDP)

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is the UN’s agency for fighting poverty, promoting sustainable development, and preventing cr...

Global Steering Group for Impact Investment (GSG)

The Global Steering Group for Impact Investment (GSG) is an independent organization that encourages impact investment and entrepreneurship to help...

Impact Reporting and Investing Standards (IRIS)

Also known by its acronym “IRIS”, this is a catalog of generally-accepted metrics developed by the Global Impact Investing Network (“GIIN”) used by...

Related Insights

When it comes to choosing values-based investments, it’s important that investors understand the differences between SRI, ESG and Impact Investing. Impact Investing is among the newest terms, coined by the Rockefeller Foundation in 2007. It is used to describe investments that generate a measurable, beneficial social or environmental impact alongside a financial return. However, this form of investing is often confused with Socially Responsible Investing (SRI) or ESG. To understand the differences, let’s take a step back and look at the evolution of these concepts.

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